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Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Military-economic implications of conversion of the post-Soviet arms industry found in the catalog.

Military-economic implications of conversion of the post-Soviet arms industry

Michael Checinski

Military-economic implications of conversion of the post-Soviet arms industry

by Michael Checinski

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  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Marjorie Mayrock Center for Soviet and East European Research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Jerusalem .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Former Soviet republics,
  • Former Soviet republics.
    • Subjects:
    • Economic conversion -- Former Soviet republics.,
    • Defense industries -- Former Soviet republics.,
    • Former Soviet republics -- Economic policy.,
    • Former Soviet republics -- Military policy.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementMichael Checinski.
      SeriesResearch paper ;, no. 75, Research paper (Merkaz le-ḥeḳer Beri. ha-M. u-Mizraḥ Eropah ʻa. sh. Margʼori Meiroḳ) ;, no. 75.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC340.D4 C44 1992
      The Physical Object
      Pagination54 p. ;
      Number of Pages54
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1461103M
      LC Control Number93118342
      OCLC/WorldCa27368126

      Dust Jacket Condition: No Dust Jacket. 17th ed. Small "discard" stamp on foredge, else a clean, tight and unmarked book with no internal or external markings. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; pages. Current products of the Chinese aircraft industry - Conversion of the Chinese arms industry, - The top arms contractors and value of defence.   Pakistan and India are important arms importers because the pace of development of their domestic arms industry remains slow.9 It will be useful to assess the possibilities of Pakistan effectively employing its defence industry optimally, thus exploring and utilising the revolution in military affairs (RMA), for the attainment of a heightened.

      The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a federal socialist state in Northern Eurasia that existed from to Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, in practice its government and economy were highly centralized until its final years. It was a one-party state governed by the Communist Party, with Moscow as its capital in its. Pakistan and India are important arms importers because the pace of development of their domestic arms industry remains slow.9 It will be useful to assess the possibilities of Pakistan effectively employing its defence industry optimally, thus exploring and utilising the revolution in military affairs (RMA), for the attainment of a heightened.

        China imports most of the arms needed to modernize its army from Russia. For several decades one of Russia’s closest strategic, military, economic and diplomatic relationships has been with India. India is the second-largest market for the Russian arms industry and the two countries have conducted joint military drills for years. Military-Industrial Complex. BIBLIOGRAPHY. In his Janu , farewell address to the nation, departing president Dwight D. Eisenhower warned his fellow Americans of what he termed the “ military-industrial complex. ” According to historian Stephen E. Ambrose, Malcolm Moos, a speechwriter for Eisenhower, invented the term when he helped the president prepare his speech.


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Military-economic implications of conversion of the post-Soviet arms industry by Michael Checinski Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Military-economic implications of conversion of the post-Soviet arms industry. [Michael Checinski]. Chęciński, Michael Chęciński, Michał, Checinski, Michael Checinski, Michael חנצ'ינסקי, מיכאל, Since the early s, Russia's once colossal defense-industrial complex has been in upheaval.

Parts of the arms industry have collapsed, and hopes for conversion from military to civilian production have proven largely illusory. An aggressive arms-sales policy—seen. The military–industrial complex (MIC) is an informal alliance between a nation's military and the defense industry that supplies it, seen together as a vested interest which influences public policy.

A driving factor behind this relationship between the government and defense-minded corporations is that both sides benefit—one side from obtaining war weapons, and the other from being paid.

For the first time, BICC brief 8 “Conversion in Poland: The Defense Industry and Base Redevelopment” offers an analysis of experiences made both in industrial and regional conversion in redevelopment process of former bases is markedly behind the restructuring of the arms industry.

In Making Peace Possible, the editors have presented a range of papers which focus on the theory and practice of economic conversion of military-oriented industry to civilian use.

The book brings together a wealth of information from academic research and from case studies undertaken by individual countries and by the United Nations. Mikhail I.

Gerasev and Viktor M. Surikov, " The Crisis in the Russian Defense Industry: Implications for Arms Exports, " in Russia in the World Arms Trade, ed.

Andrew J. Pierre and Dmitri V. The Journal of Military History () The eleven papers in this book deal with the contemporary history of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) and are examples of the growing. Taschenbuch. Neuware - The Urals are best known as the boundary between Europe and Asia.

A History of the Urals demonstrates the region's importance in its own right, as a crucible of Russia's defence industry in particular.

In the first English-language book to explore the subject fully, Paul Dukes examines the region's contribution to the power of the state in tsarist, Soviet and post-Soviet. As arms are the principal means for the conduct of organized violence, research and advice on armament and arms control are of deep interest for BICC.

BICC contributes to a better understanding of global arms dynamics and patterns of militarization. With the Global Militarization Index, BICC monitors to what extent societies are militarized.

Cambridge Core - European Studies - Russia in the 21st Century - by Steven Rosefielde. “ The Arms Industry in Developing Nations: History and Post-Cold War Assessment,” in Brauer, Jurgen and Dunne, J. (eds.), Arming the South: The Economics of Military Expenditures, Arms Production and Trade in Developing Countries.

New York; London: Palgrave, pp. – Based on an empirical examination of all aspects of the Soviet military-technical establishment, this original study examines the de-tooling and conversion of the vast Soviet defence industry, following the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union, that was vital for Russian political, economic and social regeneration and stability, and had huge implications for international.

The authors, drawn from the government, industry, and academic communities, offer a wide-ranging assessment of the political, military, economic, and industrial implications of Russian arms transfers together with specific case studies of important bilateral arms transfer relationships.

Anderton, Charles H. “A New Look at the Relationship Among Arms Races, Disarmament, and the Probability of War,” in Chatterji, Manas and Rennie Forcey, Linda (eds.), Disarmament, Economic Conversion, and Management of Peace.

New York: Praeger, pp– Google Scholar. See also, The Wall Street Journal, Dec. 13, 7 U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Office of Public Information, "Joint Statement on the U.S.-Russian Commission on Conversion of Defense Industry," Nov.

11,p. 2; and, U.S. Arms Control and DisanTiament Agency, Office of Public Information, "Third Russian-American Entrepreneurial. Eight prominent Russian experts contribute to this unique Russian-American analysis of the state of Russia's arms industry and national export controls, as well as the strategic implications of Russian arms sales to China and clients in the Middle East.

Since the early s, Russia's once colossal defense-industrial complex has been in upheaval. About the authors Chapter: Source: SIPRI Yearbook Dr Anastasia Aladysheva (Russia) is a Senior Researcher in SIPRI’s Life in Kyrgyzstan Project, focusing on the impact evaluation of development and peacebuilding programmes in Kyrgyzstan.

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